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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
if we had a little more that in washington, d.c. today and a little less of what we have. >> what do we have now? >> and overgrown city with too many politicians and lobbyists and consultants and media. seven out of the 10 richest counties in the united states, metropolitan washington, is the capital that cannot produce. it is the country that is still great with capital that is not. >> who in 1775 whatever predicted this? >> i suspect some of them were pretty cynical about politics. if you ever had an idea there would be a country of 300 million people with a capital that would have its finger on everything in the world, they might have been able to come up with a little pcynicism about that. >> said during the last years of the campaign of 2012, you started. >> the first time i did something like that was in the 1990's. i wrote a book about the english-speaking civil wars. the english revolution, the american revolution, and the american civil war. i did that because i cannot stand the idea of thinking about it bill clinton and newt gingrich too much. nice to take a vacation from thos
, metropolitan washington, it is the country did is still great but a capital that is not. would have predicted that? >> if anyone would have guessed that there would be a country of 300 million people, they may wouldn't come up with a bit of cynicism. but they were dedicated people. >> you say, during the last four years, during the campaign of 2012, you stuck your nose at this. >> the first time i did something like that was back in the 1990's. i wrote a book about the english speaking civil wars, the american revolution. i did it thinking about bill clinton and newt gingrich. it was nice to take a vacation from those guys. when i ran out of gas writing books about politics and economics, which i did a number of between 2002 and 2008, and said it is time to go back in history again. hop in my time capsule and forget about these fellows. and i have forgotten about them pretty well. i cannot remember, for example, the name of the governor of texas who was such a jerk in the primary. [laughter] effect that he could not remember the departments in the government, i guess it is a little forgivable
gallagher in washington, vice president and executive director of msnbc.com. that was general norman swa schwartzkopf you saw on your screen who passed away yesterday. i have a lasting memory of general schwartzkopf who served in the war in vietnam as well as leading gulf storm one. there was a woman from iowa. her name was peg mullen. she wrote a book about the death of her son, michael mullen. the name of the book was "friendly fire." norman schwartzkopf was the battalion commander. he was so approachable to peg mullen, so human in his relations with peg mullen, who sought to find out how her son was killed in vietnam. he died from friendly fire, which, you know obviously meant he was killed within the confines of his own unit by shrapnel from american weapons fired. it was so impressive to read about then a colonel later to become norm an schwartzkopf general "time" magazine's man of the year who was so human. just that clip we just showed right then compared to a lot of military officials who we see on tv. an actual human being would could say i hope i don't make a mistake. things li
washington should not pull out the rug from under this rebound. ship wreck, massive port strike that could happen this weekend halts commerce for the country. top of the hour, stocks now and every 15 minutes, lauren at the new york stock exchange. stocks down, but it could be worse, lauren. >> it could be worse. at one point, after 109 points, and now down 59 on the second to last trading day of the year. the nasdaq, believe it or not, is the winner today, down by just about .16%, doing the best of the three major averages. i point that out because for the month of december, the nasdaq is the only major average negative. it's interesting to know we started the year with nasdaq at 26.0 # 5, and now at 29.81, we came a long way. a good year for tech. the vix up above 20. fear of the fiscal cliff and traders saying, all right, we have this idea of a deal getting done baked into the markets, but maybe that's going to unravel a little bit. barnes and noble share, stock up more than 6 #% as i speak. the news is both good and bad. bad news first. they say the holiday period and sales trends will
washington to proclaim the protesters vandals. this about 50 # -- 50 # minutes. >> there is nothing so easy but to persuade people they are badly governed. those words were spoken by the brilliant 18th century massachusetts governor thomas hutchenson, and i'll tell you more about him later. let me tell you what else he said because the words hold true today as much as they did then in 1774. governor hutchenson said you can take the happiest and most comfortable people and use malicious, rhetorical skills to arouse popular discontent with their government, with their rulers, with everything around them, even themselves. this is one of the weaknesses, he said, these are his words "one of the weaknesses of human nature of which ambitious politicians make you to serve their purposes." i year before he uttered those words, a group of boston rebel rowsers convinced americans they were miserable, and to quote hitchenson again, "those who think they are misrabble are so despite real evidence to the contrary." now, i doubt if there's a single one of today's tea party patriots who knew what the origi
an update on the hurricane sandy relief bill making its way through congress. "washington journal" is next. >> nobody will get 100% of what they want. let's make sure middle-class families and the american economy and the world economy are not adversely impacted because people cannot do their jobs. host: the headline in this morning's "washington post" -- president obama and senate leaders were on the verge of an agreement that would let taxes rise on the wealthiest households while protecting the vast majority of americans from tax hikes set to hit in january. welcome to the saturday edition of "and the washington journal." for the first 45 minutes of the program we are going to be talking about senate negotiating a fiscal clifts deal, what has been going on on that half of the capital. see what they are talking about and how things are going. we want to get your input and your part of the conversation. you can reach out to us on twitter. facebook, facebook.com/cspan. and you can send us an e-mail. this is more from the article, the lead story in "the washington post." they ride, the deve
guys in there tangoing, you have a chance to get it done. >> brianna keilar is live now from washington. we don't have a lot of details about what went on in that meeting. maybe if they're both not talking, that may be a good thing. >> that's right. in fact, we have almost absolutely no details. the things that really interesting, though, to observers here is the statement that came out from the white house and from the speaker's office. they're the same statement verbatim. they're not leaking details. and that's something that you may see as possibly a good thing. it's certainly not a bad thing. it means they're coordinating and trying to negotiate or speak with good faith here. so this is, as you mentioned, the first time that the two have met in the last 23 days. this is the first time that john boehner and president obama have met one-on-one since election day just to give you a sense. again, to stress no word on progress that they're really get being anywhe -- getting anywhere here. house republicans don't want to cave on the white house's demand, the tax income race, the income ta
companies and some countries. >> do you plan to stay in washington? >> it depends on what kind of business i can acquire. i have a beautiful wife and i want to spend more time with him and get my golf handicap down to single digits. >> have you thought about the preservation of your papers? what will you do with all that? >> i am sending most of it to indiana university. especially the autism information. i have -- the indiana historical society will get some of my papers. i hope they find a good use for them. >> when you look back over 31 years which went by very quickly, what were the best years? >> oh, gosh, there was good in all of them. the best years from my standpoint was when i was chairman. even the people who work for me said, we felt like we were accomplishing something. we were fighting the good fight. that is one of the things i hold most dear. we were able to put on the gloves, grabbed the sword, and fight for the things we thought was right. >> thank you for spending time with this reflecting back on your ears in washington. -- years in washington. >> we are asking business ow
you sent to washington have to do their jobs. the housing market is healing, but that could stall as folks are seeing smaller paychecks. >> with time running out, it sounds like conservatives may have to fight spending when raising the debt ceiling is the new fight in the new year. harris? >> mike, democrats say they know they need republican help to get this through. they are counting on a top republican to be a deal maker. who is that person? >> that's right. mitch mcconnell, the senate minority leader we just talked about moments ago, he had been keeping a low profile and allowing speaker john boehner to negotiate directly with the president of the united states. but now a number of democrats including white house officials believe mcconnell be key. >> we ar engaged in -- we are engaged in discussions, the majority leader and myself in the hopes that we can come forward as early as sunday and have a recommendation that i could make and the majority leader can make to his conference. >> sources say speaker boehner deferred to their meeting and he told them the house leaders woul
-inflicted wound to our economy. keeping it that way means folks you sent to washington have to do their jobs. the housing market is healing, but that could stall as folks are seeing smaller paychecks. >> with time running out, it sounds like conservatives may have to fight spending when raising the debt ceiling is the new fight in the new year. harris? >> mike, democrats say they know they need republican help to get this through. they are counting on a top republican to be a deal maker. who is that person? >> that's right. mitch mcconnell, the senate minority leader we just talked about moments ago, he had been keeping a low profile and allowing speaker john boehner to negotiate directly with the president of the united states. but now a number of democrats including white house officials believe mcconnell be key. >> we ar engaged in -- we are engaged in discussions, the majority leader and myself in the hopes that we can come forward as early as sunday and have a recommendation that i could make and the majority leader can make to his conference. >> sources say speaker boehner deferred to
earthquake the market will think something is going to happen in early january this is the way washington works, they walk right up to the edge of the deal, maybe even past the edge of the deal and then something happens. i still think the market believes there will be a deal, but it is a deal that might happen on january 14th. so, i don't think december 31st is a real deadline, in the mark it's mind. >> steve, tell us, what are the things that can happen that will sort of rouse the market here, move the market up or down ire way? >> well, first of all, i think the tendency for the market right now is to go higher because you have zero interest rates and zero interest rates act as a tremendous stock market flotation device. opposing investments are, you know, yielding essentially nothing at this point, so stocks become very attractive. but i still think the big story and the stories that most traders will be watching is the fiscal cliff so that's story number one. an interesting thing happened yesterday and that's the price of oil traded to an all-time high going back to october, not an a
. maybe sequestration is going to happen so for that let's go to washington. >> juliet: all right. tick-tock, tick-tock, time is almost up for lawmakers as we say to avert the fiscal cliff. they worked throughout the weekend in hopes of hammering out some sort of deal. >> dave: peter doocy is live in washington and we hustle you over to the capitol. and what is the latest, do you think we'll get something done? >> reporter: dave, we were told late in the evening that legislative staff was going to work through the night, but the only principal we heard from was mitch mcconnell who said he and his democratic counterparts have been trading paper all day saturday, but the only big news, mcconnell cared to share with us, in the state he represents, kentucky, louisville beat the university of kentucky by three and meanwhile, the officially republican weekly address features another republican senator explaining once again why a deal before monday night's deadline is so important. >> at a time when our federal debt's topped 16 trillion dollars, it's been more than three years since the senate
's rooms, washington, d.c. december 24, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable mac thornberry to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the brare will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: god of light, we give you thanks for giving us another day, as this chamber lies silent, we pray for joy, hope, and love within the homes of the members of the people's house. send us your spirit so that there might be peace on earth, good will among all men and women. all that is done this day be for your great honor and glory. amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. the share will lead the house in the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the chair lays before the h
that will allow us to realize that over the next number of years. >> christina with the washington times, thank you for coming to speak with us. u.s. officials have said several days moved up into the region, talked about why we send ships to the region, and, also, the number one concern with north korea's planned missile launch, whether they are violating u.n., you know, international regulations or whether we're worried that they could reach a missile to reach the u.s.. what's the number one concern with that, and why are we moving ships to the region? >> the moving the ships would be today moving them today or in the long run? >> today -- this week. >> oh, okay. well, we moved ships around the region all the time. we have a fairly robust deployed naval force that's actually, you know, stationed in that part of the world. we do move them around for exercises, move them around for contingencies, and in this case, you know, should seem logical we'll move them around to have the best situational awareness that we have, and to the drug that those ships are capable of participating in ballistic mi
was in washington that month. i think americans always liked churchill. he had been speaking in america for 20 years. was american. guest: his mother was american. he was well known on the lecture circuit and now here he is as prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing he had an ally and americans took a liking to him because they were very wary of churchill that all he wanted were his colonies become. b not liberty or not roosevelt's four freedoms but to recapture everything the japanese had taken from him by using american boys and that americans resented and they were wary of that host: we are about out of time. when did you finish this? guest: early this year? host: early 2012? guest: yes. and about six months of copy editing and final editing with bill phillips. host: out of all the characters in it besides winston chump if you were -- churchill if you were going it write another book who would it be? guest: admiral king comes to mind. and a nod to my dad who was a navy guy. fascinating character. host: will you write another book? guest: y
in washington and how the fiscal cliff is likely to effect investment decisions. we have value investor leon cooperman, he's going to join us on set starting at 7:00 eastern time. then at 8:00 eastern, we have black op co-founder and ceo ralph schlosstein. and lynn hutchins will join us. we'll talk about what they see playing out and what they think is working when it comes to the markets now. >> the bill that the president says is in the house that he will sign if -- that's in the senate -- >> the senate. >> the senate that he will sign if the house passes it is what? >> that is $. >> -- that is 250? >> 250? >> he said 400. he said, i have the pen, let's keep tax rates where they are for everyone at 250 and below. so this one, that's c these guys are pretty clever because that would keep rates where they are for everyone at a million and below. no middle-class taxpayers up to a million dollars -- >> that's no matter what, isn't it, in either bill? >>yon r -- i think it would be the same in either one. that's not -- what reid and i guess pelosi, you saw that, said she opposes the million-dol
to washington, and the senate starts to debate the ratification of this and the only nature of the obstacle arises jefferson himself lead him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire a territory. and he starts to hem and haw say we need a constitutional amendment to give the government the power. napoleon back in france had overthrown the government. he was not exactly -- >> host: constitution nap. >> guest: yeah. not repressed by the argument. he started make noises saying i'm going revoke the treaty. madison, our baseline alternative comes to jefferson. -- >> host: the secretary of state. >> guest: right. closest friend. secretary of state in the room for every negotiation. he said you can't do this anymore. you have to agree and yield it's too big an turn to let your sphrict view. he agrees and he back down. they make purchase. jefferson displays a great deal of skill. the negotiation he choose monroe, absolutely the right person. he gets through the senate, successfully, manages all the things. so he displays flexibility, but think about flexible because
was in washington that month. i think americans like to churchill. >> his mom was american. >> his mom was american. he was well-known on the lecture circuit. now here he is prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing americans took a liking to him because they were very wary -- and still were many -- that all they wanted were the colonies back. not liberty. not war freedoms. to recapture everything the japanese had taken from them by using american boys. and that americans resented. they were wary of that. as well as george marshall. >> we are about out of time. when did you finish this? >> this is about -- early this year? >> early 2012? >> yes. about six months of copyediting and final editing with bill. >> out of all of the characters in at the sides winston churchill, if you were going to write another book, who would it be? >> well, admiral king resigned. and nod to my dad, who was a navy guy. fascinating character. >> will you write another book? >> yes. but i am not sure what it will be yet. i do have an idea in my mind that my editor lik
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)